Is The Silver Squeeze Over?

The Comex still has metal, but outflows have increased, and in some cases, it’s taking a bit longer to get delivery. Significant demand from…

Bob Coleman on Palisades Gold Radio

Tom welcomes Bob Coleman back to the show, and he brings his insight into the precious metals space and the overall complexities of futures markets.

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The Comex had a lot of metal coming onto the exchange last summer because premiums were high. He explains how the arbitrage market has changed at the Comex and why a lot of metal is coming off the market.

He explains backwardation in the futures market and the various terms like open interest and eligible that the Comex and the LBMA utilize. The CME group has a delivery report that shows how many warrants change hands; this report has nothing to do with physical bars’ movement. The warehouse stock report is a better indicator as it shows the actual movement of metal.

The Comex still has metal, but outflows have increased, and in some cases, it’s taking a bit longer to get delivery. Significant demand from ETF’s has put stress on participants, and therefore the lease rates have moved higher.

Jeff Currie’s comments on his recent CNBC interview may have been misunderstood since ETFs aren’t legally allowed to trade on futures markets. However, the authorized participants who deliver metals to the exchanges could be holding futures for the metal, either long or short.

He explains some of the differences between the regulations for the Comex and London Vaults.

There are several differences between holding physical metal yourself and having shares in an ETF. Consider holding metal yourself. ETFs are convenient, but most investors don’t realize that you have no claim to the underlying physical metal. Also, your shares may be controlled by other entities that could become insolvent or force you to settle in cash.

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