CIA whistleblower Jeffrey Sterling found guilty on all counts

A jury found CIA whistleblower Jeffrey Sterling is guilty of all charges against him, according to RT’s Manuel Rapalo at the Virginia courthouse. The government accused Sterling of illegally revealing classified information about a mission.
Sterling was charged under the Espionage Act for disclosing classified information about a mission meant to slow Iran’s nuclear program to New York Times reporter James Risen, who then wrote about the CIA’s Iranian plot in his 2006 book, “State of War.”

The plan’s goal was to learn more about the country’s controversial nuclear program and impair its progress, and the schematics were reportedly funneled to the Iranians via a Russian scientist with the codename “Merlin”.
Sterling was the fifth person in history to be charged with mishandling national defense information under the Espionage Act.

Originally posted at RT.com

A jury found CIA whistleblower Jeffrey Sterling is guilty of all charges against him, according to RT’s Manuel Rapalo at the Virginia courthouse. The government accused Sterling of illegally revealing classified information about a mission.

Sterling was charged under the Espionage Act for disclosing classified information about a mission meant to slow Iran’s nuclear program to New York Times reporter James Risen, who then wrote about the CIA’s Iranian plot in his 2006 book, “State of War.” The plan’s goal was to learn more about the country’s controversial nuclear program and impair its progress, and the schematics were reportedly funneled to the Iranians via a Russian scientist with the codename “Merlin”.

Risen was also critical of the plan in his book, saying it could have inadvertently helped Iran if they were able to identify what was wrong with the blueprints. Prosecutor Eric Olshan argued in court that these criticisms matched up with Sterling’s own view of the mission, and portrayed the CIA as unresponsive to potential risks.

“The only person who comes out smelling like roses in Mr. Risen’s telling is Jeffrey Sterling,” Olshan said.

The former CIA officer, who was fired in the early 2000s, was convicted of nine counts of unauthorized disclosure of national defense information and other related charges. US District Judge Leonie M. Brinkema allowed Sterling to remain free on bond until his April 24 sentencing.

Sterling was the fifth person in history to be charged with mishandling national defense information under the Espionage Act.