usmint-goldcoinsalesToday’s charts of the day examines US Mint gold eagle and silver eagle sales totals from 2008-2013.
Surprisingly, while ASE sales have increased the most on a percentage basis, it is US Mint gold eagle sales that are literally going parabolic.

MUST SEE US Mint Gold & Silver Eagle sales charts are below:

Dr. Constantin Gurdgiev has analysed the data of US Mint coin sales in December 2012 and has looked at them in their important historical context going back to 1986. He is one of the few academics in the world to have researched and written academic papers about gold.

We believe that the fall in demand is due to renewed complacency regarding the global debt crisis. It is also likely due to the fact that traditional buyers of gold coins and bars have secured their allocation to store of wealth gold bullion in recent years. It may also be because there are only a few new retail buyers coming into the bullion market in western countries – unlike in Asian countries and particularly China.

U.S. Mint data does not support the view of a dramatic, reckless,  greedy buying of gold by the fabled speculatively crazed retail buyer or the fabled ‘gold rush’ that some headline writers and media commentators have claimed is taking place.
Three consecutive years of falling demand for gold coins and the lowest demand for U.S. gold coins since 2007 shows how  those still calling gold a bubble, for very simplistic reasons, remain ill informed.

Bubbles are of course characterised by mass participation by the public and surging demand to record levels.

Zeal010413BSubmitted by Adam Hamilton:

The US Mint’s bullion coins are called American Eagles. The “bullion” distinction means their value is based solely on the spot prices of gold and silver, with no special premium for rarity. So they offer investors far more physical metal per dollar spent than expensive collectible coins. I’ve always believed maximizing one’s total gold and silver holdings is far more prudent than playing the scarcity game.

The US Mint’s production is based on real-world demand from coin dealers. When these guys have enough inventory from existing investors selling, they don’t need to order new Eagles from the Mint. So the Mint ramping up production is always a response to rising coin-dealer demand, which is in turn the result of rising investor demand for physical gold and silver. Thus the Mint’s sales data is valuable.

It is made available on a monthly basis for both gold and silver Eagles. The charts in this essay superimpose these coin sales over the daily gold and silver price action over the course of their entire secular bulls. Despite the perception of 2012 being a weak year for the precious metals, new physical demand from investors for American Eagles is actually robust to strong. This is certainly a bullish omen.