There has to be a good reason why the CFTC won’t openly address the clear evidence of a COMEX silver manipulation, as well as why JPMorgan and the CME Group would turn away from direct accusations of wrongdoing that would constitute slander and libel if such allegations weren’t true. Something has to be holding the CFTC back from addressing that which should and must be addressed.
Actually, I think there are two reasons:

One of the world’s foremost silver analysts Theodore Butler has elaborated on another “powerful” bullish factor which SCREAMS at us to buy silver”.

Jamie DimonGranted, if you are going to label something as the greatest lie ever, it must involve something important, both in substance and in terms of who told the lie. In this case, the lie involves what’s at the heart of the silver manipulation and happens to be the issue that I consider the key factor for its price. Importantly, the lie came from the federal regulator overseeing the silver market, the CFTC.
The good news is that you will be able to decide for yourself if my assertion is correct, given that the proof is nearly incontrovertible.
The best news is that as the lie is more widely recognized, it should have a positive impact on the price of silver…

launch rocket verticalWhen JPMorgan decides it has enough silver, as I believe it is close to now – the price will soar if it does nothing and refrains from adding new shorts on the COMEX.
The best part about this amazing story is that it offers the investment opportunity of a lifetime.
All one has to do is what JPMorgan has done – buy as much silver as one is capable of buying – and then wait for JPMorgan to help itself…

butlerI did not immediately see the monumental change that began to occur five years ago. This astonishing development that had begun in 2011 did not come clear to me until late 2013.
I discovered that the largest U.S. bank, JPMorgan Chase, began to accumulate massive amounts of physical silver starting in 2011 and has continued that accumulation to this day.
All told, I believe JPMorgan has acquired somewhere between 400 and 500 million ounces, the largest privately held stockpile of silver in history.
They are positioned to make $100 billion or more in a runaway silver market…

sold outWe’re told that surging investment demand for retail forms of silver is a whole different animal than surging investment demand for 1000 oz bars.
Is it really?  I don’t think so.
Once a wholesale physical silver shortage kicks in, that shortage can’t be further contained by derivatives trading and most likely will have to burn itself out the old-fashioned way:

A rare event occurred this past week; the CFTC charged a major food company, Kraft, Inc., with price manipulation in the wheat market.
The real question is why the selective prosecution of the law?  Why is the CFTC going after Kraft on a complicated case with an alleged payoff that looks like chump change (around $5 million total profit to Kraft), when public data indicate JPMorgan shorts the silver market whenever prices rise to cap and drive prices lower in order to profit on those short sales and accumulate silver at unfairly low prices; with JPM’s cumulative illicit take running into the hundreds of millions if not billions of dollars?
Why is JPMorgan above the law?
Here’s why:

According to global market data from the top Official Mints, sales of Silver Eagles  originate overwhelmingly from public retail investment demand rather than by one large bank… such as JP Morgan.  
I say this in response to the allegation put forth by silver analyst, Ted Butler who believes JP Morgan purchased half of all Silver Eagles since April, 2011.

Ted Butler, who has made this claim over the past several months, does so again in his recent article, The Perfect Crime.
I wanted to provide a rebuttal to Butler’s allegation that JP Morgan was the large buyer of Silver Eagles because his opinion takes CREDIT AWAY FROM THE PUBLIC, and puts it in the hands of the BANKERS.
While Ted Butler provides excellent information on the silver market, I believe his opinion on this matter is incorrect:

A couple of weeks ago, a long time subscriber correctly pointed out that I seemed to be speculating more than usual in my conclusion that JPMorgan was the big buyer of Silver Eagles and had accumulated as many as 300 million oz of silver, including Eagles and bullion. The subscriber noted that I usually relied on hard core facts that could be documented and not on speculation.
As it turns out, I believe there are sufficient number of hard facts behind my speculation, but I had failed to point them out.
So let me present the facts, as I see them, that point to JPMorgan having amassed the largest physical silver position in history.