sprottWe are currently in an environment where policy makers are intent on devaluing their currencies in an effort to create growth. Real rates continue to stay negative in most of the developed world. Every marginal dollar of debt that is created is producing lower and lower amounts of growth. In a world overwhelmed by mountains of debt and economic growth which is sub-par at best, precious metals and real assets can act as insurance against the stupidity of policy makers. The evidence pointing towards the suppression of the gold price is becoming increasingly apparent. Don’t be the last person to figure this out! The current sell-off in gold should be viewed not with extreme trepidation but as an unbelievable opportunity to buy the metal at an artificially low value.

silver marketGuest Post

While mainstream financial and a growing number of economic forecasters focus on investors fleeing the gold bullion market, I am following in the footsteps of central banks around the world.

As investors sold ETFs in February, central banks around the world added to their gold bullion reserves.

GoldMoney has released an interview with Chairman  James Turk about his claim that central banks are holding less in their physical gold reserves than many assume.   Turk explains the problem that central banks report gold and gold receivables as one line item on their balance sheets. This allows them to lease out physical gold in return for paper claimsposing the question of just how much physical gold is left.

He also discusses the Gold Money Index and the gold-based Fear Index. Both show that gold remains undervalued compared with historical norms. He also talks about how close we are to a “Golden Cliff”, where the western central banks stop lending out their gold, and what the systemic repercussions of this are likely to be.

Full interview below:

Money manager Eric Sprott says, “The central banks’ gold is likely gone with no realistic chance of getting it back.” Don’t expect this revelation to get any coverage by the mainstream media. In an interview with Bloomberg last week, Sprott’s analysis was met with words such as “gold bug” and “conspiracy theory.” Sprott answers that sort of disrespect by saying, “We’ve had so many conspiracies, I don’t know why anyone would think this was unusual.” To back up his point, he named “LIBOR, electricity markets in California and the Madoff” scandals. Sprott’s analysis shows a “flat supply” and at least a “2,500 ton net increase in gold demand” since 2000. “Where’s all the gold coming from?” asks Sprott. He says Western central banks “. . . keep supplying this market with product in order to keep the price down so nobody knows how vulnerable the situation is.” Sprott, who manages nearly $10 billion in assets, boldly proclaims, “We have a shortage of gold.” Join Greg Hunter as he goes One-on-One with Eric Sprott of Sprott Asset Management.