Prepare yourself for the worst and divest in your dependence upon the system as much as possible.

 

From Mac Slavo, SHTFPlan:

An official wave of “recession” is nigh, and the potential for financial fallout and further hard times is perhaps imminent.

The Fed’s disastrous rescue plan after the 2008 financial crisis has left the U.S. economy in a fragile and vulnerable state.

Unlimited quantitative easing, or easy money for those at the top of the heap, have redirected investment into sectors that can’t or won’t stimulate the real economy that affects “everyday Americans.” No jobs. Frozen wages. Mounting living costs. And an exploding debt bubble in several areas.  You know the drill.

Now, even the banksters steering the system are being forced to admit that central bank efforts have failed to “stimulate demand,” and that a contracted and dried up economic landscape is giving way to another step backwards – a recession that no one can sweep under the carpet.

via CNBC:

“We are seven years into a full-fledged, all out, central bankers doing everything they can to stimulate demand,” Bank of America-Merrill Lynch’s head of U.S. equity and quantitative strategy Savita Subramanian recently warned on CNBC’s ” Fast Money .”

“We looked at all of these indicators that have been pretty good at forecasting recessions and we extrapolated that if they follow the current trends they’re on, we’re going to hit a recession sometime in the second half of next year.”

[…]

“What scares me is the market been so fragile. So, remember what happened in January? We got a whiff of bad news and all of the sudden the market is at 1800,” she said—a move that augured poorly for the near-term.

“I think that speaks to the reaction function of the market. There are a lot of itchy trigger fingers. There’s lot of violent trades that can really roil a fairly complacent environment.”

Not only are the markets ready for disaster, and essentially only waiting for a flashpoint to initiate crisis, but the shift in investment that has been directed by QE3 has rendered the private sector, job-creating economy doomed to fail.

Bank of America isn’t the only Wall Street bailout recipient to warn about what is coming. JP Morgan Chase has signaled a volatile crisis and the end phase of the Federal Reserve’s failed stimulation experiment, and Goldman Sachs went so far as to warn that we are entering the a “Third Wave” of financial crisis, of which 2008 was merely the first chapter.

The head of the investment banking firm Macquarie Group went even further, cautioning that we are witnessing nothing short of a terminal economy… one which they very well might not be able to put back together again:

Sadly, the forecast is much darker, and the next financial collapse much deeper than almost anyone has prepared for. The outlook from this global strategist at the Macquarie Group is beyond doom and gloom – it is a literal existential crisis.

via the Epoch Times:

Enter Viktor Shvets, the global strategist of the investment bank Macquarie Group…

Global central banks with their easy money policies of negative interest rates and quantitative easing are working against a debt deflation scenario, with limited success, according to Shvets. “That was the entire idea of aggressive monetary policies: Stimulate investment and consumption. None of that works, there is no evidence. It can impact asset prices, but they don’t flow into the real economy,” he said.

[…]

“The private sector will never recover, it will never multiply money again,” he told Epoch Times in an interview. His main theme is the “declining return on humans,” which means that in today’s digital world,normal humans don’t grow productivity fast enough to justify more jobs and higher wages as the machines are taking over.

“There is no productivity on a global basis. Secular stagnation, technological shifts, monetary policy, all are suppressing productivity growth rates,” he says.

So much for the recovery.

By the time the corporate news feeds, politicians and central banks admit we are officially in a “recession,” chances are that the majority of Americans will already be coming to grips with the extreme downsides of a prolonged depression where nothing flows easy, and everything becomes a struggle.

Prepare yourself for the worst and divest in your dependence upon the system as much as possible.

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This Week Only… 

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  1. “normal humans don’t grow productivity fast enough to justify more jobs and higher wages as the machines are taking over.”…….as opposed to abnormal humans?

    So now we’ve annexed something new to Ivestopedia’s entry on ROI’s ….. His main theme is the “declining return on humans,” or ROH’s.

     

  2. The robots are taking over and everybody is still doing what they were doing ten years ago. The TSA gropes their weiners at the airports and they still fly.  They see a robot concierge at the front desk and they still check in. Damn they’re dumb.

    • “The robots are taking over and everybody is still doing what they were doing ten years ago.”

      Yep, I sure am.  But then, retirement tends to be like that.  🙂

       

      “The TSA gropes their weiners at the airports and they still fly.”

      Nope, not flying, not ever so long as the Thugs Standing Around are still molesting citizens in airports.  Wife agrees 100%.  We can afford to fly 3-4 times a year but don’t because of this BS.  I would imagine that others do the same.  If the sheeple weren’t filling the planes, the airline companies would get REAL interested in fixing this problem.  As it is, they could not care less.

       

        “They see a robot concierge at the front desk and they still check in.”

      Would not tolerate that or a damned robotic waiter.  I vote with my money and I am not voting for that.

       

      “Damn they’re dumb.”

      Some are, some aren’t.  Apathetic is just as bad as dumb, if not worse.

       

  3. Years back I had listened to a radio broadcast by someone that survived the Great Depression without feeling too much damage. He had opened shop as a reupholster businessman. Plenty of customers willing to refurbish rather than purchase new. Probably not a bad choice today.

    • Probably not.  Same could be said for any number of local small businesses that provide a useful service.  Appliance repair could be good too.  Same for home and car repairs.  Bicycle shop?  Lots of options.  The trick is to provide real value in something that is necessary.

  4. @PreciousMental

     

    My grandfather on my mother’s side was born in 1912 as the years went on in the Great Depression leading up to World War 2 he was Moonshiner make ends meet. He was also an engineer on a locomotive.  They called him Red. Because he had Irish red hair .  And knew how to survive a bad situation!  I wager that there’s only three or four percent of us that can survive the way he did in this day and age due to the fact that we have become a soft Nation.  B******* entitlements have  served to only make the nation lazy for the most part and dependent upon a government with a mentality of give away the store today to he’ll with tomorrow.   How sad is that??

    • Pretty sad.

       

      My paternal grandfather was a lot of things… logger, miner, fruit picker, cannery worker, WW-I soldier, gas station operator, laundry foreman, and farmer.  It’s likely that there were other things he did as well.  He hunted and fished for the family table and wasn’t too concerned about having a license or what time of year it was.  He never took more than he needed and would share extra with friends and neighbors, so the fish and game folks tended to look the other way.  Times were hard and the last thing anyone needed was some government type making them even harder.  When he could not sell his farm produce for enough to keep going, he also made and sold “moon”.  He was always amazed at the number of people who didn’t have money to buy the food he was trying to sell but who could always come up with $2 for a pint of whiskey.  All part of the human condition, I suppose.

       

    • @Falco

      Must be in the Irishman’s blood, my fathers side………grandfather was a rail conductor. Another similarity was he’d like moonshine. 🙂

      High praise to the moonshiners. As a teen (pre-legal age) I had a small scale still with a couple pals. Note to would be still operators, DO NOT use rubber hose for condensing tube. Our hooch tasted like retread  Uniroyals.

    • lol @Precious Mental

       

      “Note to would be still operators, DO NOT use rubber hose for condensing tube. Our hooch tasted like retread  Uniroyals.”

      Indeed so.  There are a number of issues with distillation, including the fact that alcohol fumes are VERY flammable and can form explosive mixtures with air.  More than one would-be moon maker managed to blow themselves up or got cooked by a surprise fire-ball.  More than a few managed to poison themselves and / or their customers via using an old car radiator as a condenser.

       

  5. Bring in the robots!!!!   They don’t need lunch breaks, bathroom breaks, sleep, or vacations.   Their maintenance costs are for lower than their union negotiated hourly wages.   They do not create problems for human resources and are almost never fired!   Many humans should be fairly concerned.

    Actually I agree with them and see they have all completed Peter Schiff’s latest book!!!!

    • Agreed @Sheep Dog

       

      A really good case can be made for comparing the so-called “smart phone” crowd to zombies… the walking dead… well, brain dead, anyway.  lol

      The one and only thing that would cause me to buy a smart phone would be so I could monitor a home security system.  That would be useful, unlike all the other reasons that are implied in the ownership of these mind-deadening devices.

       

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